Kimaya Suni — Adopting a Country

     On the road, on the run, Kimaya Suni reflected on the path that had taken her from her hometown just outside of Mumbai, India to this nondescript hotel just outside of Georgetown, KY.    She had worked hard to take the pigeon English of her grade school in India to fluent English where she could compete for the research positions at the NIH.  After school she had stayed on as part of the H1B program and applied for citizenship.  That had been one of the proudest days of her life, the awarding of citizenship.  The ceremony attended by her friends and family brought tears to her eyes as she took the Oath of Citizenship.

     Her mind flashed back to an image of herself playing with her friends, wandering through the streets of Mumbai.  Her parents were of the upper caste and they lived an upper middle class life.  By Indian standards they were wealthy.  Yet, just walking a few blocks from her house would find her in the middle Dharavi of one of Mumbai’s most infamous slums.  The streets were  filled with squalor and multiple brothels lined the edge of the slum.  She had been with one of her friends when two guys, coming out of one of the brothels, tried to grab her and her friend.  What had ensued was a mad dash through the streets and narrow alley ways in order to escape enslavement or worse.  Her friend had run the other way and had not been lucky enough to get away.  Her friend had completely vanished after that.  Had she not been so skinny and managed to squeeze into one of the many small drainage tunnels that littered the landscape she too would have met the same fate.  She had believed the US never had things like that happen.  Now she was beginning to wonder.

    The search for her friend involved the police and many of her parents friends.  The police had always sounded nice but to her 10 year old ears there was something off about how they sounded.   She had always thought they were more involved in not finding her friend than in actually locating her.   It was one of those experiences that shape people.  It had made her a believer in the ideals of America.  Over time, watching the US government, her faith in those ideals had been shaken but still America was a wonderful place, freer than anywhere else in the world.  Even the NSA spying and Edward Snowden had not changed her mind.  Of course being hunted as a fugitive and wild beast was not how she expected the ideals of freedom to be played out.  She now understood how Snowden must have felt.   Moving to Russia is not out of the question.

Modern Day Slavery

The idea that people today are enslaved is appalling to most of those living in the modern western world.  It is true that slavery exist in its worst form as the bondage of children sold for sex or as enforced marriage by Muslims that claim to own their women.  That is the type of slavery that we, the enlightened, concerned westerners can say, “That is barbaric.”  Whether this horror occurs today or whether it occurred in its brutal past as slaves were brought to the United States, the concept of slavery has a number of underlying principles. As we review those principles keep in mind that these principles can apply to other processes, not just slavery.

1.)  Slavery is about controlling the enslaved at all times.

2.)  Slavery seeks to use the control of the enslaved to produce a product without paying a wage.

3.)  In order for the enslaved to produce the slaver must provide a base level of sustenance for the enslaved.

4.) The slaver will seek to keep the slave as uninformed as possible to minimize the chance that the slave will pursue any avenue other than dependence on the slaver.

5.)  When the enslaved no longer produces then that sustenance is cut off.

6.)  Before the enslaved ceases to produce if the threat of removing sustenance is not sufficient motivation other methods of motivation may be employed, such as instilling fear.

6.)  If the slave ever becomes a burden to the slaver the slave will be discarded.  (Killed, Banished, or Abandoned)

Having laid all this out, lets look at our federal and state welfare programs.  How much like slavery are the results of these programs?  Do they control those receiving benefits?  Since these programs provide a base living often over $25,000 they discourage people from starting in the workforce.  Why would someone go to work for $10 per hour when they receive more by collecting food stamps and welfare.  So, for starters they prevent people from seeking honest employment.    The recipients live in fear of losing their government sustenance.  That too is like slavery.  That fear means that those same people will always vote for people that will preserve their payments.  That is the labor component.  The government pays them so they keep the government in power.    If they quit voting for those people the same people would cut them off in a heart beat.

Yes, government benefits have a lot to do with slavery.  The long term impact is the destruction of the family unit.  If you look at communities that have been dependent on government the longest they are the ones with the greatest social instability, crime and drugs.  That is not a coincidence. If you take away a community’s dignity by removing work you remove self-esteem and hope.  The result is predictable.  If we remove these benefits from these communities, they will not starve, but they will find work and find ways to earn an income that supports themselves.  Human nature’s drive to survive will dominate that challenge and over a short time the whole plight of these enslaved communities would be change for the better.